Ford and Google Set to Announce Autonomous Car Partnership @alvarodabril
Sep04

Ford and Google Set to Announce Autonomous Car Partnership @alvarodabril

The day self-driving cars could be hitting public roads on a large scale is sooner than you think. According to Yahoo Autos, Ford Motor Company is set to announce their partnership with Google on this unique venture at the Consumer Electronics Show in January 2016. The debate on self-driving cars is anything but new. Many would say that self-driving cars could potentially be dangerous in the event of computer failure. On the other hand, supporters say that it could save the 81% of car crashes that are caused by human error. Regardless of which way you side on the issue, Ford and Google developing a partnership on autonomous vehicles brings Google’s self-driving technology and Ford’s ingenious vehicle engineering together to bring autonomous vehicles one step closer to our nation’s roads. Believe it or not, this isn’t the first time that Google has been experimenting with its own self-driving systems. Google already has 53 test vehicles on the road in both California and Texas with a staggering 1.3 million miles in autonomous driving. The advantages of teaming up with Ford from Google’s perspective is that they will save millions of dollars in the research, development and engineering behind developing a vehicle to support the autonomous technology. Being the first automaker to develop a partnership like this with Google puts Ford a cut above the rest in comparison to other automakers like Tesla, Mercedes-Benz, BMW and Volvo as they are working independently towards autonomous driving. With that in mind, Mark Fields, CEO of Ford Motor Company, announced in January 2014 that he believes somebody will introduce autonomous vehicles within the next five years. What does this all mean though? It has been said that Ford Motor Company and Google will be working toward expanded safety technology meaning automatic braking and enabling hands-free operation of vehicles by automating functions like steering, braking and throttle control. Crazy to think, right? Tell us what you think through our Facebook, Twitter or Instagram social channels. And don’t forget thatCJ Pony Parts is your go-to spot for the latest products and info on all things Mustang, EcoBoost and Bronco, so visit our website...

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200 original & unusual packaging @alvarodabril
Nov08

200 original & unusual packaging @alvarodabril

The packaging design is a essential part of product marketing tactics. It is clear that a creative and newsworthy packaging design will help attract the attention of potential buyers. Clever packaging designs can put more value and good image to a product and make it more salable. However, a product packaging design is not only useful in marketing and advertising. It also inspires graphic designers and enhances their creativity and innovation. I have done a little research to come up with a list of original package design examples. These concepts are all good specimens of the extra hard work that designers put into the work. After you are done browsing on this list of creative packaging designs, tell us what you think of this post by sharing your comments below. You are welcome to share this article with your friends, as...

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Reasons India Could Become the World’s Next E-Commerce Giant @alvarodabril
Nov08

Reasons India Could Become the World’s Next E-Commerce Giant @alvarodabril

While most people in India are just starting to get online, a look at the recent history of China’s online evolution suggests India may be entering a take-off phase. In 2014, China’s e-tailing market was worth $458 billion, while India’s was worth just $4 billion. But India’s e-tailing market could swell to $60 billion in the next five years, a recent report from Credit Suisse said. Here are five ways in which the report said it looks like India is following in China’s footsteps.   Its Shallow Penetration While it seems like China has a big head start, India is only about seven years behind it in terms of Internet penetration. Around 20% of Indians have access to the Internet today. China’s ratio was that low in 2008 and has more than doubled since then. The surge in Internet use could be even faster in India where a tidal wave of smartphones that cost less than $100 is making online access affordable to hundreds of millions of people for the first time. Its Online Newbies Less than 1% of shopping is done online in India. While that may not sound like a huge success, it is a huge opportunity. Again, it was about seven years ago that China was in the same place. Today around 12% of China’s shopping is done online. Books, apparel, cosmetics and consumer electronics are product categories that have boomed in China over the last five years, and Indian consumers are following suit by increasingly buying these products as well as furniture and groceries online. It’s unorganized India is similar to China in that only a small slice of its retail industry—about 8% in India and 20% in China—is organized through modern branded chains. Online shopping actually has bigger potential in countries where the offline experience is less organized. Its small town advantage Most Indians–about 85%–live in small towns with a population of less than a 500,000. This could be a good thing for e-commerce firms. While delivering their goods to so many tiny towns can be expensive, the fact that most people live in cities without a mall or chain store should make them more likely to buy things online, the report said. Last year, Snapdeal, one of India’s largest e-commerce firms, said it would use much of the $627 million it raised from Japan’s Softbank Corp., to tap into these small towns and cities. 5It’s mobile friendly You don’t have to teach the budding Indian online consumer to use his smartphone to make purchases because that is the only online experience he knows. Around 14% of Indians have smartphones today—exactly where China was four...

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Principles of Business in China @alvarodabril
Nov08

Principles of Business in China @alvarodabril

1. Get your top management team to take a week off to go to experience China. In China, take them outside the usual experience of Audi limousines and luxury hotels and arrange for exposure to experiences relevant to your business – for example, do store checks or visit private homes of average citizens. Take the team to a fourth-tier city and to the countryside for a more holistic picture. 2. Beware of industrial dynamics A common cause of losses in China is that foreign firms are so focused on market growth rates that they neglect the basics of competitive analysis. In the beer industry, for instance, more than 20 foreign brewers entered in the mid-1990s, each of them planning to capture on average 15 percent of their market segment. In a market lacking clear differentiation, they also found themselves competing with around 600 local brewers, many of them subsidised by local governments. Some expected these issues to disappear over time, but almost twenty years later, the fundamental situation has changed little. Many industries in China resemble the beer industry, with overcapacity, high levels of fragmentation, subsidised local competition, and foreigners willing to absorb losses from their “strategic” investments. 3. Take your time Many companies want to get on the ground quickly. In one case, the CEO told his head of strategy to get China operations going within six months. Time pressure of this sort can create problems later on. It tends to result in sloppy planning and analysis. It shifts the attention from finding the right partner to finding any partner, regardless of partner fit. Moreover, it weakens your hand in negotiations. Your Chinese counterpart will know how to use your time constraints against you, and you will walk away with a worse deal. 4. Chinese society is collectivist Conventional wisdom and cross-cultural management studies, such as Geert Hofstede’s seminal work, emphasise the collectivist nature of Chinese society. However, visitors to China often remark how individualist they find behaviour to be. This seeming contradiction is the result of a conflation of collectivism with widespread cooperation. Chinese society is collectivist in that individuals identify with an “in-group” consisting of family, clan, and friends. Within this, cooperation is the norm. Outside it, zero-sum competition is common. As a result, self-organised, as opposed to hierarchically imposed, cooperation can be difficult to achieve—an issue epitomised in Sun Yat-sen’s famous observation that China is a “tray of loose sand.” In addition, zero-sum competition means that your Chinese counterpart may not believe in win-win solutions. One can observe this, for instance, in the tendency to re-open negotiations just as everything seems settled, especially if one...

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Bob Parsons® 16 Rules for Success in Business and Life in General
Nov08

Bob Parsons® 16 Rules for Success in Business and Life in General

1. Get and stay out of your comfort zone.   I believe that not much happens of any significance when we’re in our comfort zone. I hear people say, “But I’m concerned about security.” My response to that is simple: “Security is for cadavers.” 2. Never give up.   Almost nothing works the first time it’s attempted. Just because what you’re doing does not seem to be working, doesn’t mean it won’t work. It just means that it might not work the way you’re doing it. If it was easy, everyone would be doing it, and you wouldn’t have an opportunity. 3. When you’re ready to quit, you’re closer than you think.   There’s an old Chinese saying that I just love, and I believe it is so true. It goes like this: “The temptation to quit will be greatest just before you are about to succeed.” 4. With regard to whatever worries you, not only accept the worst thing that could happen, but make it a point to quantify what the worst thing could be.   Very seldom will the worst consequence be anywhere near as bad as a cloud of “undefined consequences.” My father would tell me early on, when I was struggling and losing my shirt trying to get Parsons Technology going, “Well, Robert, if it doesn’t work, they can’t eat you.” 5. Focus on what you want to have happen.   Remember that old saying, “As you think, so shall you be.” 6. Take things a day at a time.   No matter how difficult your situation is, you can get through it if you don’t look too far into the future, and focus on the present moment. You can get through anything one day at a time. 7. Always be moving forward.   Never stop investing. Never stop improving. Never stop doing something new. The moment you stop improving your organization, it starts to die. Make it your goal to be better each and every day, in some small way. Remember the Japanese concept of Kaizen. Small daily improvements eventually result in huge advantages. 8. Be quick to decide.   Remember what General George S. Patton said: “A good plan violently executed today is far and away better than a perfect plan tomorrow.” 9. Measure everything of significance.   I swear this is true. Anything that is measured and watched, improves. 10. Anything that is not managed will deteriorate.   If you want to uncover problems you don’t know about, take a few moments and look closely at the areas you haven’t examined for a while. I guarantee you problems will be there. 11....

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